Social Media's Productivity Payoff - James Manyika, Michael Chui, and Hugo Sarrazin - Harvard Business Review

  • okt 2012
  • Mark
  • 923

Mooie cijfers (en een rare term) voor het sociale intranet. Plus input voor de roadmap hoe er te komen (niets nieuws, maar goed te reproduceren). De woorden zijn van de auteurs, de nummering en de selectie is van mij.

"interaction workers," (managers, professionals, sales people, and others whose work requires frequent interpersonal interactions, independent judgment, and access to knowledge)

  1. spend 28% of their workdays answering, writing, or responding to email.
  2. They also spend another 19% of the time trying to track down information (including searching through their own e-mail files) and
  3. 14% collaborating with co-workers.

These activities could potentially be done much more efficiently and effectively using social technologies — we figure by 20-25%.

To get the improvement in knowledge worker productivity, organizations need robust and widespread participation by all sorts of employees (you never know where that dark matter is hiding).

  1. Firstly, social technologies will only succeed if they become part of the daily workflow, not an extra item on a to-do list that will never get checked off. Sometimes this means the company's workflows need to change, sometimes the social tools must be adapted to workflows, and in many cases, both workflows and technologies will have to be adjusted.
  2. Participation, in turn, depends on having an environment of openness, information sharing, and trust — the sort of culture that many organizations have not yet established. For this to happen, leaders must take the lead
  3. How do you create applications that are as compelling to corporate employees as they are to those same people in their personal lives? Techniques such as self-reinforcing behavior loops (e.g. gamification), A/B testing, and mobile deployment can be applied in the enterprise, just as they are used in the consumer space.
Social Media's Productivity Payoff - James Manyika, Michael Chui, and Hugo Sarrazin - Harvard Business Review

301 Moved Permanently

http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/08/social_medias_p...

Wij maken gebruik van cookies voor onze service. Bezoek je onze website dan ga je akkoord met de cookies.